What Size Inner Tube For 700x35c? (Quick Solution)

Here’s the quick answer:

Pick a tube that says 700 x [Width range], where the width range includes 35. For example, a tube that says “700×35-42” would be perfect for your bike.

Want a recommendation?


Inner tubes

Co-op Cycles do a fantastic inner tube that has a Schrader valve. Outside of the USA? Then get one of these.

Schrader valves are the same type of valve as you get on standard car tires.

These tubes are tough and designed to be thorn-resistant. Particularly so when they’re fitted to 700x35c wheels like yours. Why? Well, these tubes are made for wheels ranging from 35mm wide up to 43mm wide. At 35mm wide like yours are, the rubber won’t need to be stretched as thin as it would for 43mm wheels. Thicker tube walls = more protection from thorns and other sharp bits on the pavement.


Want a more detailed explanation?

No problem! Okay, so 700x35c is the size of your bicycle tire as measured according to the old ‘French system’.

‘700’ refers to the tire diameter (in millimeters).

‘x’ just means multiplied by.

‘35’ refers to the nominal width of the tire (in millimeters).

‘c’ is the tire width code, using the French system. Nowadays this classification is generally obsolete, but it used to be used (in France) to categorize tires from the narrowest ones (called ‘a’) up to the widest ones (known as ‘d’). A ‘c’ tire therefore would have been nearly as wide as they got.

Now, would it be helpful to get a recommended tire for your 700x35c bike? Read on!


Do you need a tire to go with your inner tube?

When you’re getting new tires for your bike, just be certain to choose ones that say “700x35c”.

Simple as that – even easier than choosing an inner tube.

There’s a lot of variability in tire sizing and your best bet is to pick the exact same code of tire as you have currently. Don’t try and convert from millimeters to inches, for example, as there can be big differences between the actual sizing of these tires. And big differences in sizing can lead to big problems (such as punctures) down the road.

Schwalbe have an excellent selection of tires and the tire pictured above is a great example. It’s ideal for your bike and gets really good feedback from reviewers for durability and toughness. Just what you need in a bike tire.

Have a look closely at the pictures of the tread pattern and you’ll notice that it’s an ideal combo for your bike as it means the tires will work great on a range of surface textures. That solid strip means smooth travel on paved roads or hard trails (without the vibration that comes with full-on tires designed for mountain biking). Then the tread pattern along the edges gives great grip and confident cornering on looser surfaces like gravel or dirt.


Do you need a refresher on how to change a tube?

First up, you need some basic kit with you when you head out on the bike:

  • Spare tubes (I generally pack a couple)
  • Tire repair kit
  • Tire levers (plastic ones are best, I think)
  • Pump (including the Presta valve adaptor I mentioned earlier)

Replacing a tube should then take 45mins max to complete. There are five basic steps to fixing a flat tire:

  1. Take off the bike wheel
  2. Slip off the tube
  3. Find out the cause of the flat (e.g. thorn or nail)
  4. Either repair or replace the inner tube
  5. Fit the bike wheel back on

For an easy how-to guide, have a quick watch of this video.

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